Entertainment & Media

Wadsworth: An Introspective Dive

By Alain Deen

Volume 2 Issue 6

April 14, 2022

Wadsworth: An Introspective Dive

Image provided by Fortune

"So, in summation…It was Mrs. Peacock in the kitchen with the dagger. Colonel Mustard in the Lounge with the revolver. Mrs. Scarlet in the library with the candlestick. Professor Plum in the hall with the revolver. Mrs. White in the ballroom with the rope. And Mr. Green in the billiard room with the lead pipe." Clue: The Movie (1985) quickly became a staple cult classic. The film is based on the famous Hasbro board game of the same name. In the board game, six characters are invited to an unusual and seemingly random dinner party in the 1950s. They are led to a mansion, where a number of murders occur. The purpose of the board game is to figure out who the murderer is, underscoring its traditional "whodunit" theme. However, it is worth noting that the butler, Wadsworth, is not included in the board game, but he is included in the film and the stage play. In terms of character analysis, Wadsworth does not hold much depth. However, it is worth noting that the character of Wadsworth is a culmination of years of intricate butlery, stereotypes, and other fictional prototypes. Let’s talk about it. In the board game, Wadsworth is not included as a character. In my opinion, this was done on purpose. Here is my take on the dilemma: Wadsworth is actually included in the game, but his figurine is invisible. I am just kidding. At any rate, my point is that Wadsworth serves as a metaphorical puppeteer in the board game. In other words, each player is their own Wadsworth. They manipulate each of the six characters (Colonel Mustard, Mrs. Peacock, Miss Scarlet, Mr. Green, and Professor Plum) throughout the game's duration in an attempt to frame each of them for murder. Whether it's through utilizing various weapons or locations in Boddy Manor to achieve this purpose, "Wadsworth" is the master puppeteer behind the game's drama. I played Wadsworth in Valley Stream North's recent production of Clue; it was a great experience, to say the least. I had a lot of fun with the character and delved deep into his twisted yet comedic mind. From playing Wadsworth, I gained more insight into the character himself, learning more about the intricacies attached to his puppeteering tendencies. My character served as the driving force for all the events throughout the show. He led the suspects through each and every scene, allowing for a smooth course of events leading up to the show's dramatic culmination. He permits each of the six suspects to enter the mansion, often introducing them to each other. Once they are all comfortable, he reveals the reason they are all there in the first place. "Ladies and gentlemen, my instructions are clear. It seems the six of you have one thing in common. You are all being blackmailed. For some considerable time, all of you have been paying what you can afford, and in some cases more than you can afford, to someone who threatens to expose you." This highlights Wadsworth's knowledgeable background throughout the course of the play. He was aware of most of the events before they occurred. In other words, he was always one step ahead. He also manipulated various events, highlighting his sly, conniving background. "He was Wadsworth, my Butler" "OHHHHH!" "I want to thank all of you for killing off my network of spies and informers, which you all did splendidly, by the way. Not to mention the added bonus of our evening together: I have each and every one of you on the hook for murder." By the end of the play, it is revealed that Wadsworth is actually Mr. Boddy, directly supporting the argument that Wadsworth serves as a puppeteer in every medium of the franchise. He was behind everything all along, highlighting his sly and conniving nature. Thus, it is worth noting that Wadsworth is representative of the audience. In a sense, the audience subliminally desires to manipulate the guests' actions, highlighting their deep alignment with Wadsworth's character arc. Wadsworth's character goes deeper than the surface, and that must be noted when conducting a character analysis. He really is more than just a butler. He simultaneously serves as the audience, the narrator, and the franchise's driving force, even if his likeness isn't 3D modeled on a miniature figurine.